All posts filed under: Guest Photographers

Using HDR for Architectural Photography

While blending or merging several exposures into one final High Dynamic Range (HDR) image remains a popular creative option for landscape photographers over the years, its use in architectural and commercial shoots has some big benefits that are unique to the challenges of shooting these genres. In many scenarios, especially outdoors, photographers can normally rely on graduated filters to balance a scene by blocking large parts of the frame with a neutral density layer – evening up the brightness from the shadows to the highlights. But while this works well on large, sweeping horizons and foregrounds (i.e., landscape shooting), when it comes to making that process work for odd-shaped buildings and structures with various hotspots and dark areas, we’re often unable to use the same approach. And where using a filter isn’t an option, or where the sheer amount of “fill light” you’d need to balance the scene becomes prohibitive, that’s where Capture One’s HDR Merge function can now deliver the results you need. How It’s Used HDR Merge relies on you capturing two or …

Shooting HDR for Landscape

By Rachel Ross Introduction Very quickly it’s important to establish what HDR merging is and why it’s so useful for landscape photography – because it is. If you’ve ever picked up a camera you’ll know that what the camera captures often doesn’t quite match what you see with your eyes, especially in situations of high contrast. Your eyes and brain work in tandem to provide an image that is balanced through the entire tonal range, but cameras aren’t quite there yet. Cameras still struggle to capture the full dynamic range spectrum of darks, shadows, mid-tones and highlights in a single frame, as usually a camera will expose the shadow areas correctly or the highlights or takes some average of the two that doesn’t accurately expose any of it. HDR merging is the solution, as it captures the full range of tones in multiple frames of the same scene (this is ‘bracketing’), and blends them together to show the full range of light in a single image. So, HDR is really perfect when you want to …

Shooting for Panoramic Stitching By Paul Reiffer

So you’re heading out to shoot a panoramic series of images, knowing that Capture One’s latest development can stitch them all together into one seamless photograph when you import them, right? Well, while Capture One’s new Panoramic Stitch is an impressive tool, there are a few things you can do to help get the very best results and most of them are actually at the point of capture. Keeping that in mind, we’re going to detail a few tips and tricks to get the most out of your stitched image, and how to choose the right projection setting for your chosen subject. The process of capturing a sequence of images can be as simple as panning across a single row of 2 shots to blend together into one larger view, through to catching multi-row, 360º “tiny planets” with all the gear that’s needed to do that accurately. Equipment The first thing to say is you don’t necessarily need any additional equipment to get a good stitch in Capture One. It’s been tested and proven on …