All posts filed under: Storytelling

Photography student Josefine Amalie explores underrepresented bodies in her work The Human Body

RAW talent with Josefine Amalie

Josefine Amalie is a dreamer. Sensitive to the inequalities in the world, the recently graduated Danish photographer is interested in creating narratives through her work that break with what we are used to seeing. In this latest post in our RAW Talent series, Josefine tells us about how she tries to deconstruct stereotypes and create a different reality with her photography and how Capture One helps her along the way. Tell us a bit about yourself! Where to start. I’m an idealist and I easily get impassioned. I have a vibrant inner life, where I often daydream and invent all sorts of stories and visualizations. I hate that we are not all equal and I often get overwhelmed by the thought of people struggling all over the world. And for the formal part; I have served an apprenticeship for fashion photographer Rasmus Mogensen in Paris and corporate and portrait photographer Norddahl & Co in Copenhagen during my studies at NEXT CPH. Besides that, I have a bachelor’s in Communication and Digital Media from Aalborg University …

Reimagening Sicilian stories with fashion photographer MOJA

In the wake of the #MeToo revelations, Luxembourg-based fashion photographer MOJA wanted a way to engage in the conversation, show support, and celebrate the strength of women. The result was a photo series he named “Women and Cinema”, which, for the fourth year in a row, will be featured at the Cannes film festival. This year he is putting the spotlight on Sicilian scenery, cinema, and femininity.   “We love to go to Sicily because Sicily, contrary to what everybody thinks, is a matriarchal society,” says MOJA referencing the historical associations many have between Sicily and a macho Mafia culture. He points out that the image of a macho Sicilian society has been reinforced by how the island has been represented in film. In his upcoming portrait series, MOJA and his team will be using many of the unique locations on the Italian island as a backdrop to reinterpret iconic scenes from 12 classic and modern movies set in Sicily putting female roles at the center. “The problem we had when selecting films to reinterpret …

Polly Irungu on creating a space for Black women photographers

As a young Kenyan girl growing up in the United States, a career in photography was not on multimedia journalist and photographer Polly Irungu’s radar. Today, she is on a mission to make the photography industry a more inclusive and diverse place. In 2020, Polly started Black Women Photographers – a global community of over 1000 members that aims to put Black creatives in the line of sight of gatekeepers of the industry and getting Black women and non-binary photographers hired. The road to inclusivity Working her way through the ranks and finding her footing in the photography industry was far from an easy, straightforward path for Polly. The industry was (and still is to a large extent) dominated by white men, and opportunities for Black photographers were often limited to Black History Month or to what happened to be a timely social uprising. “I didn’t see myself in this industry. I didn’t see other people who look like me being celebrated in the same way as their counterparts. And when it comes down to …

Zoë Noble on capturing women who choose to be childfree

Starting out as a side project for Berlin-based beauty photographer Zoë Noble to shine a light on women who choose not to have children, “We Are Childfree” has become a community of women across the world that support each other, share advice for how to live childfree, and work to destigmatize the act of choosing not to have children. “I didn’t have any role models growing up, and the ones that I saw were negative; it was always the mad, career-obsessed, hating-children, woman. And I knew that wasn’t me,” says beauty and still photographer Zoë Noble about the portrayal of childfree women. Realizing early on that she did not want to have children made her acutely aware of how radical that decision is within most societies. She felt that her choice was met with judgment and at times a lack of respect, having doctors tell her that she would change her mind or rejecting her request to have procedures that would affect her ability to have children. “When I had fibroids and I wasn’t allowed …