All posts filed under: Guest Photographers

Capture One Pro workflow with professional food photographer Rachel Korinek

We asked Australian-born, Canda-based food photographer Rachel Korinek of Two Loves Studio to share her secrets for a smooth workflow that helps her capture appetizing scenes and create mouth-watering images for her clients. Read her step-by-step guide for a faster workflow from shoot to delivery. As a professional food photographer, Capture One Pro has allowed me to seamlessly tether a photo shoot, edit and select as I go, followed by efficiently exporting with Export Recipes. An overview of my editing workflow is as follows: ● Tethering and syncing basic edits to each new photo. ● Selecting hero shots using star ratings. ● Editing selected images based on client needs or food stories. ● Taking images to be retouched into Photoshop as a PSD. ● Exporting files into organized folders using Export Recipes. Let’s discuss the workflow approach I take in a little more depth. Tethering & Syncing Base Edits and Metadata. Tethering allows still life and food photographers to make small compositional changes that are important to tell a food story. Capture One Pro also …

Poochie Collins on writing love letters with light

It was with a camera gifted from her grandfather documenting her college years that Brooklyn-based portrait photographer Poochie Collins first discovered her love of photography. As an introvert attempting to avoid having to talk to people, she started shooting street photography, preferring to keep her distance and observe from afar. Today, she uses her skill and perception to catch the little, intimate details about her subjects which she draws out with her sympathetic style of portraiture and captures spontaneous moments in time. We spoke to Poochie about her creative process, her intentions and inspiration when shooting her subjects, and how she gives her audience the chance to experience the Black community from a different vantage point. For a deep dive into Poochie Collins’ perspectives on a selection of her photographic portraits, watch the webinar. You describe your work as writing love letters with light and creating visual time capsules. What do you consider when planning your shoots? Funnily enough, I very rarely actually plan out a shoot. Most of the time, even with doing portrait …

Using HDR for architectural photography

While blending or merging several exposures into one final High Dynamic Range (HDR) image remains a popular creative option for landscape photographers over the years, its use in architectural and commercial shoots has some big benefits that are unique to the challenges of shooting these genres. In many scenarios, especially outdoors, photographers can normally rely on graduated filters to balance a scene by blocking large parts of the frame with a neutral density layer – evening up the brightness from the shadows to the highlights. But while this works well on large, sweeping horizons and foregrounds (i.e., landscape shooting), when it comes to making that process work for odd-shaped buildings and structures with various hotspots and dark areas, we’re often unable to use the same approach. And where using a filter isn’t an option, or where the sheer amount of “fill light” you’d need to balance the scene becomes prohibitive, that’s where Capture One’s HDR Merge function can now deliver the results you need. How It’s Used HDR Merge relies on you capturing two or …

Shooting HDR for Landscape

By Rachel Ross Introduction Very quickly it’s important to establish what HDR merging is and why it’s so useful for landscape photography – because it is. If you’ve ever picked up a camera you’ll know that what the camera captures often doesn’t quite match what you see with your eyes, especially in situations of high contrast. Your eyes and brain work in tandem to provide an image that is balanced through the entire tonal range, but cameras aren’t quite there yet. Cameras still struggle to capture the full dynamic range spectrum of darks, shadows, mid-tones and highlights in a single frame, as usually a camera will expose the shadow areas correctly or the highlights or takes some average of the two that doesn’t accurately expose any of it. HDR merging is the solution, as it captures the full range of tones in multiple frames of the same scene (this is ‘bracketing’), and blends them together to show the full range of light in a single image. So, HDR is really perfect when you want to …