All posts filed under: Community

Jan Wischermann tests out the flexibility of working on the go with Capture One for iPad

Retoucher Jan Wischermann on using Capture One for iPad on the go

Being on the road for two weeks, shooting in some of the most scenic locations to be found in Sicily, retoucher and Capture One Ambassador Jan Wischermann got to experience the flexibility of Capture One for iPad using the Beta version of the app to work on the go for the project “Sicily, Women and Cinema“. Watch the behind-the-scenes of the shoots to see how Jan was able to get a head start on his editing.     “Sicily, Women and Cinema” is a photo series by fashion photographer MOJA shot over 12 days in Sicily. The project aims to show off the unique scenery found on the island and encourage more film studios to choose it as the location for their next film. Moving between different sets all over the Italian island, with time to kill on long car rides or while the crew was setting up the shoots, expert retoucher Jan Wischermann was able to start his work while away from the computer using the newly released Beta version of Capture One for …

How fashion photographer MOJA collaborates better using Capture One Live

In the life of a photographer, you learn to expect the unexpected. When plans change at a moment’s notice, having the right tools can be a lifesaver. For fashion photographer MOJA, Capture One Live came to the rescue when clients had last-minute comments and the crew was unable to be on set for the project “Sicily, Women and Cinema”. See behind the scenes of the project and discover how MOJA uses Capture One Live for better collaboration off and on location.     “We have faced a few problems [with the shoots]. Some of the places we were shooting in were a bit small and we have a team of 30 persons. It is quite difficult to move them around the place,” explains the Luxembourg-based photographer MOJA about the project. “Sicily, Women and Cinema” is a 12-day shoot intended to show off the unique scenery found in Sicily and encourage more film studios to choose the island as the location for their next film. The result of the shoots will be shown at the Cannes …

Seven reasons to update to the latest version of Capture One Pro

Starting April 5, you can explore automatic keystone correction, new sorting options, longer Capture One Live sessions, and other improvements to speed up your workflow with the latest version of Capture One Pro. Here are seven reasons to update your software today. 1. Get perfectly straight lines with the new and improved Keystone tool Getting perfectly straight lines can be tricky when you’re trying to capture a tall building, the distant horizon or mesmerizing geometrical shapes. In these cases, the enhanced Keystone tool can help you easily correct any crooked lines or perspective distortion. Previously, the Keystone tool let you straighten your lines by using vertical and horizontal sliders or using cursor markers to pinpoint lines that should be parallel. The newest version of Capture One Pro offers a brand new way of using the tool by introducing automatic correction, driven by AI, to get you perfectly straight lines every time. Make vertical, horizontal, or full Keystone corrections using line detection to speed up and improve workflows and efficiency when you need straight lines in …

Polly Irungu on creating a space for Black women photographers

As a young Kenyan girl growing up in the United States, a career in photography was not on multimedia journalist and photographer Polly Irungu’s radar. Today, she is on a mission to make the photography industry a more inclusive and diverse place. In 2020, Polly started Black Women Photographers – a global community of over 1000 members that aims to put Black creatives in the line of sight of gatekeepers of the industry and getting Black women and non-binary photographers hired. The road to inclusivity Working her way through the ranks and finding her footing in the photography industry was far from an easy, straightforward path for Polly. The industry was (and still is to a large extent) dominated by white men, and opportunities for Black photographers were often limited to Black History Month or to what happened to be a timely social uprising. “I didn’t see myself in this industry. I didn’t see other people who look like me being celebrated in the same way as their counterparts. And when it comes down to …