All posts filed under: Color Editing

Beauty and still-life photographer Zoe Noble shares her five favorite features in Capture One to speed up her workflow

5 favorite Capture One features with Zoë Noble

Beauty and still-life photographer Zoë Noble has been using Capture One for years. Working with big brands like L’Oréal Paris, Ogilvy, and No7 and personal projects like We are Childfree, which tells the stories of women who choose to not have children, Zoë works meticulously to make her images look as good as they can. In this guest blog, Zoë shares her five favorite features in Capture One Pro and how she uses them to get more control over her images, save time on her editing and make her images stand out. 1. Style it out with Layers It’s important to be able to control as much of the editing process as possible so I can bring my own personal vision to life. I love that I can now use Layers with my Styles with the new Capture One Pro 23 because they allow me to play with the opacity of the layers and tweak the edit to my taste. The editing process is so much simpler now that I can have different elements of …

Three Black photographers who explore the world through color

There is a reason we don’t see the world in black and white. Colors are an integral part of how we experience life and how we communicate. For a photographer, colors are another tool to set a mood and help tell a story, and getting them right can make or break an image. In celebration of Black History Month and the role color plays in our lives, we spoke to three photographers, who are all part of the Black Woman Photographers collective, about their work and how they explore their subject matters with color. Daniella Almona For a photographer, understanding color is just as important as understanding composition and angles. At least to Lagos-born, Atlanta-based photographer Daniella Almona. With her portraits, she works to highlight blackness in all forms and plays with highly saturated colors in backdrops, props, clothes, and make-up to bring out her subjects’ features. With lush reds, warm oranges, and velvety blues drawing the viewer into the frame, she elicits emotion in both her subjects and audience. “The way colors interact with …