All posts filed under: Landscape photography

Into the Wild with Landscape Photographer Leroy Souhuwat

Hailing from the Netherlands and with roots in South Maluku, Iceland-based nature and landscape photographer Leroy Souhuwat brings an exploratory passion and a worldly perspective to his images, which are punctuated by raw, powerful landscapes – and the odd adorable puffin or two. Leroy’s work aims to inspire humans to reconsider their relationship with nature, particularly when confronted with its enormity and unpredictability. We spoke with Leroy about his photography journey and how the untamed landscapes of his new home, along with the support and encouragement of the wider photographic community, have inspired his creative endeavors. How did you get into photography? In 2018 I moved from The Netherlands to Iceland, it was a very impulsive move, but it might be one of the best decisions I have made so far in my life. In that first year, I went on many road trips around the country and took all my photos with just my smartphone. I wanted to share all the incredible views with my family and friends abroad. Then I got so into …

Shooting HDR for Landscape

By Rachel Ross Introduction Very quickly it’s important to establish what HDR merging is and why it’s so useful for landscape photography – because it is. If you’ve ever picked up a camera you’ll know that what the camera captures often doesn’t quite match what you see with your eyes, especially in situations of high contrast. Your eyes and brain work in tandem to provide an image that is balanced through the entire tonal range, but cameras aren’t quite there yet. Cameras still struggle to capture the full dynamic range spectrum of darks, shadows, mid-tones and highlights in a single frame, as usually a camera will expose the shadow areas correctly or the highlights or takes some average of the two that doesn’t accurately expose any of it. HDR merging is the solution, as it captures the full range of tones in multiple frames of the same scene (this is ‘bracketing’), and blends them together to show the full range of light in a single image. So, HDR is really perfect when you want to …

Shooting for Panoramic Stitching By Paul Reiffer

So you’re heading out to shoot a panoramic series of images, knowing that Capture One’s latest development can stitch them all together into one seamless photograph when you import them, right? Well, while Capture One’s new Panoramic Stitch is an impressive tool, there are a few things you can do to help get the very best results and most of them are actually at the point of capture. Keeping that in mind, we’re going to detail a few tips and tricks to get the most out of your stitched image, and how to choose the right projection setting for your chosen subject. The process of capturing a sequence of images can be as simple as panning across a single row of 2 shots to blend together into one larger view, through to catching multi-row, 360º “tiny planets” with all the gear that’s needed to do that accurately. Equipment The first thing to say is you don’t necessarily need any additional equipment to get a good stitch in Capture One. It’s been tested and proven on …

Polina Washington – Painting the world as she sees it

Based in rainy, gray St. Petersburg, cinematic storyteller Polina Washington brings a much more colorful world to life in her photography. Continually exploring who she is as a creative, Polina’s style has jumped all over the spectrum during the last 15 years, from black and white street photography to multiple exposure on film to self-portraits and nature. “Photography is always connected with who you are in the moment because I think you’re never the same person as you were yesterday. The more you explore, the more opportunities you get for inspiration and to create something new. It’s not about being locked in a box of one style – it should be about trying to explore everything around you. For now, I’m mostly interested in creating cinematic stories,” she says. With darker settings as her backdrop, Polina uses color and light as her key tools to show the world as she sees it – a brighter, dreamier reality. For many years, light and color were the essentials missing from Polina’s life and art: “I never knew …