All posts filed under: Photographers

Centering people of color in her work, Daniella Almona works to promote blackness in all its forms. In the photo: Black model wearing a green shirt and white pants in front of a purple backdrop. Photos edited in Capture One 23.

Dive into color with Daniella Almona

Photography is all about telling stories from a new perspective. Or at least it is for Daniella Almona. Not seeing people like her represented in front of or behind the camera, the Nigerian-born fashion and portrait photographer has made it her mission to be a voice of change by centering blackness and color in all its forms in her work. Using Capture One Pro 23, the up-and-coming photographer has been playing around with the new features to find out how they help her better bring untold stories to life. Daniella Almona has always been surrounded by bright colors. Growing up in Lagos, Nigeria, she recalls going to the market; the fruit and trees intermingled with the elaborate colors and patterns worn by the people around her creating vibrant scenes that still stand out in her mind. “I think that subconsciously inspired my love for color, which is a big part of my photography and the work I create.” With lush greens, warm oranges, velvety blues, and more hypnotizing colors drawing the viewer into the frame, …

Three portraits of women by women

Women portraying women: three female photographers to zoom in on

Since the invention of photography, countless images have been taken with women as the subject. Most of these have historically been taken by men. As more women are carving out a space for themselves in the industry, the way women on both sides of the camera are represented is changing. In celebration of International Women’s Day, we asked three female photographers about the depiction of women in their work and their thoughts on what the future looks like for women in photography. Eva Sitko Through her colorful style of photography, German photographer and former graphic designer Eva Sitko works to bring out emotions in her subjects to show the interpersonal dynamics of our feelings. Sitko takes a keen interest in her subjects’ emotional display, in particular when shooting women. “A self-confident, strong woman who deals openly with her emotions is the incarnation of beauty for me.” Her interest in the emotional life of her subjects has led her to notice differences in how men and women are represented. “Women are often portrayed in very different …

Poochie Collins on writing love letters with light

It was with a camera gifted from her grandfather documenting her college years that Brooklyn-based portrait photographer Poochie Collins first discovered her love of photography. As an introvert attempting to avoid having to talk to people, she started shooting street photography, preferring to keep her distance and observe from afar. Today, she uses her skill and perception to catch the little, intimate details about her subjects which she draws out with her sympathetic style of portraiture and captures spontaneous moments in time. We spoke to Poochie about her creative process, her intentions and inspiration when shooting her subjects, and how she gives her audience the chance to experience the Black community from a different vantage point. For a deep dive into Poochie Collins’ perspectives on a selection of her photographic portraits, watch the webinar. You describe your work as writing love letters with light and creating visual time capsules. What do you consider when planning your shoots? Funnily enough, I very rarely actually plan out a shoot. Most of the time, even with doing portrait …

Life lessons from a pro: Joe McNally on capturing his imagination

Joe McNally has seen it all. Known for his technical skills and vast storytelling experience from shooting for the likes of LIFE, National Geographic, and Adidas, McNally has worked in over 70 countries on both journalistic and commercial assignments. In his new book, “The Real Deal: Field Notes from the Life of a Working Photographer”, he looks back at the past 40 years of his work and the stories, skills, and observations to come out of it. We talked to McNally about his book, how he ended up where he is today, the experiences and lessons he has gained along the way, and that time he brought a cow into the kitchen. Where did the idea for the book come from? There are many photographic books in the marketplace that show you the f-stop, the shutter speed, where to put the light, where to put the camera, it’s basically a blueprint for producing X type of result. This book is not that. The motivation for the book stems from being a photographer for a very …