All posts filed under: Tethered

Capture One for iPad, a photo editing tool for photographers on the go

What to expect from Capture One for iPad

Soon you can make your workflow even faster and take it on the go with Capture One for iPad. With the announcement of Capture One for iPad, you might be wondering how it will work. Creating the iPad app has meant making choices about how to best serve our community to meet their needs in a timely manner. In this article, we will clarify some of those choices and explain what to expect from the iPad app.   What Can You Expect From Capture One for iPad? First, the Capture One iPad app is not intended to be a replacement for the desktop app, but instead its best companion. Even though the iPad app works perfectly well on its own, it is built to be a part of an ecosystem where you can work smoothly across devices to get the most out of your time, money, and images. Throughout the development of the app, we have spoken to professional photographers from different disciplines about their needs and wishes. We have also looked at the usage …

Off the leash: how to get more freedom with wireless tethering

Shooting tethered no longer means being confined to a set radius. With the emergence of wireless tethering, both studio and on-location photographers can now be closer to the action while maintaining a smooth workflow and close collaboration with clients and colleagues. What is Tethered Shooting? Shooting tethered is simply shooting with your camera connected to your computer so that the images taken are quickly imported into the editing software, where they are displayed in real-time. While shooting tethered, the photographer can change exposure, trigger, and compose through LiveView. This provides an environment for the photographer, a creative team, the subject, or the client to have great control over the output by seeing the images on a large screen and adjusting the shoot parameters on the fly. Many photographers work with tethered shooting as it also allows them to instantly organize their images and apply styles or sets of adjustments to better show a client a closer-to-finished result. Traditional tethering is done via USB cable between the camera and computer, and as a good quality cable …